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Int J Food Microbiol. 2003 Dec 15;89(1):1-10.

Planktonic or biofilm growth affects survival, hydrophobicity and protein expression patterns of a pathogenic Campylobacter jejuni strain.

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  • 1Department of Applied Microbiology and Food Science, University of Saskatchewan, 51 Campus Drive, Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7N 5A8. gary.dykes@foodscience.afisc.csiro.au

Abstract

The effect of planktonic or biofilm modes of growth on survival, hydrophobicity and cellular protein expression patterns of a pathogenic Campylobacter jejuni strain were determined. This was achieved by growing the strain in brain heart infusion broth (with 1% yeast extract), or attached to glass beads in the same medium, at 37 degrees C for 48 h under microaerophilic conditions. Cells from the broth or the bead surfaces were stored at different temperatures (4, 10, 25 and 37 degrees C) for 28 days in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and monitored at appropriate time intervals for culturable numbers and hydrophobicity by standard methods. In addition, cells were inoculated onto the surface of two processed meat products (a bologna and a summer sausage) vacuum packaged and stored at 4 degrees C for 28 days. Numbers of culturable cells were monitored at appropriate time intervals by standard methods. Cells from the broth or the bead surfaces were also examined for protein expression using two-dimensional protein electrophoresis. Results indicated that numbers of culturable cells in phosphate buffered saline decreased from approximately 6 log colony forming units (cfu) g(-1) to undetectable levels within 14-day storage in a temperature dependent manner. Hydrophobicity of broth grown cells decreased from 15% to 0% adherence to xylene over the same time in a temperature independent manner. Cells grown in a biofilm mode initially displayed a <0.3% adherence to xylene which was maintained during storage. Furthermore, cells grown in the biofilm mode decreased in number more rapidly on storage in buffer than their counterparts grown in broth. Numbers of culturable cells on meat decreased from approximately 5 log cfu g(-1) to undetectable levels within 14-day storage in a product dependent manner, with the most rapid decrease observed for the more acidic summer sausage. Cells grown in a biofilm mode decreased in number more rapidly on storage than broth grown cells. The protein expression patterns differed between planktonic and biofilm cells with seven unique and 12 up-regulated protein spots expressed in a growth mode specific manner. A number of the differentially expressed spots were tentatively identified, by comparison to existing literature, as surface- and stress-associated proteins. Despite the elicitation of some putative stress proteins, this study importantly indicates that biofilm cells of C. jejuni are less resistant to stress than their planktonic counterparts and may lack a sophisticated adaptive stress-resistance response. These findings have implication in determining the risks of infection associated with C. jejuni contamination on food.

PMID:
14580968
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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