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Acad Med. 2003 Oct;78(10 Suppl):S20-3.

Identification of physician and patient attributes that influence the likelihood of screening for intimate partner violence.

Author information

  • 1Department of Physiology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester 01655, USA. Julie.Jonassen@umassmed.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

Effective assessment of intimate partner violence (IPV) demands that everyone at risk be screened. To identify potential barriers, paper-and-pencil case scenarios identified possible practitioner and patient attributes that influence IPV screening.

METHOD:

First-year residents responded to one of four short written scenarios describing a divorced female patient with nonlocalized abdominal pain; variables were patient's age and abdominal bruising. Residents rated their likelihood of screening for IPV and seven other screening tasks and self-assessed their competence in performing each task. Regression analyses assessed the influence of resident and patient characteristics on screening likelihood.

RESULTS:

Patient bruising, younger patient age, and resident self-assessed competence best predicted IPV screening. Men were less likely than women to screen for IPV.

CONCLUSIONS:

Although most physicians receive training on IPV in medical school, barriers to IPV screening still exist. Identifying obstacles to IPV risk-assessment is an essential prerequisite for improving educational programs that promote routine IPV screening.

PMID:
14557085
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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