Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
JAMA. 2003 Oct 8;290(14):1868-74.

Excess length of stay, charges, and mortality attributable to medical injuries during hospitalization.

Author information

  • 1Center for Quality Improvement and Patient Safety, Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, Department of Health and Human Services, Rockville, Md 20850, USA. czhan@ahrq.gov

Abstract

CONTEXT:

Although medical injuries are recognized as a major hazard in the health care system, little is known about their impact.

OBJECTIVE:

To assess excess length of stay, charges, and deaths attributable to medical injuries during hospitalization.

DESIGN, SETTING, AND PATIENTS:

The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Patient Safety Indicators (PSIs) were used to identify medical injuries in 7.45 million hospital discharge abstracts from 994 acute-care hospitals across 28 states in 2000 in the AHRQ Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Sample database.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

Length of stay, charges, and mortality that were recorded in hospital discharge abstracts and were attributable to medical injuries according to 18 PSIs.

RESULTS:

Excess length of stay attributable to medical injuries ranged from 0 days for injury to a neonate to 10.89 days for postoperative sepsis, excess charges ranged from 0 dollar for obstetric trauma (without vaginal instrumentation) to 57 727 dollars for postoperative sepsis, and excess mortality ranged from 0% for obstetric trauma to 21.96% for postoperative sepsis (P<.001). Following postoperative sepsis, the second most serious event was postoperative wound dehiscence, with 9.42 extra days in the hospital, 40 323 dollars in excess charges, and 9.63% attributable mortality. Infection due to medical care was associated with 9.58 extra days, 38 656 dollars in excess charges, and 4.31% attributable mortality.

CONCLUSION:

Some injuries incurred during hospitalization pose a significant threat to patients and costs to society, but the impact of such injury is highly variable.

Comment in

PMID:
14532315
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Icon for Silverchair Information Systems
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk