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Comb Chem High Throughput Screen. 2003 Sep;6(6):501-12.

Expanding the scope of aromatic polyketides by combinatorial biosynthesis.

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  • 1Galilaeus Oy, Kaarina, Finland.

Abstract

Combinatorial biosynthesis is a technology for mixing genes responsible for the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites, in order to generate products for compound libraries serendipitously or to cause desired modifications to natural products. Both of these approaches are extremely useful in drug discovery. Streptomyces and related species are abundant in bioactive secondary metabolites and were therefore the first microbes to be used for combinatorial biosynthesis. Polyketides are the most abundant medicinal agents among natural products. Structural diversity and a wide scope of bioactivities are typical of the group. However, the common feature of polyketides is a biosynthetic process from simple carboxylic acid residues. In molecular genetics, polyketides are sub-classified as types I and II, called modular and aromatic polyketides respectively. The best-known bioactivities of aromatic polyketides are their antibacterial and antitumor effects. Genetic analysis of aromatic polyketides has resulted in almost 30 cloned and identified biosynthetic gene clusters. Several biosynthetic enzymes are flexible enough to allow their use in combinatorial biosynthesis to create high diversity compound libraries. This review describes the state of the art of combinatorial biosynthesis, giving anthracyclines as examples. Contiguous DNA sequences for antibiotics, cloned from four different anthracycline producers, provide tools for rapid lead optimization or other structural modification processes, and not only for anthracyclines. Two gene cassettes enabling fast and flexible structural modification of polyketides are introduced in this paper.

PMID:
14529376
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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