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Results: 3

1.

The Drosophila melanogaster genome.

Author information

  • 1Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project, Department of Genome Sciences, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, USA. celniker@bdgp.lbl.gov

Abstract

Drosophila's importance as a model organism made it an obvious choice to be among the first genomes sequenced, and the Release 1 sequence of the euchromatic portion of the genome was published in March 2000. This accomplishment demonstrated that a whole genome shotgun (WGS) strategy could produce a reliable metazoan genome sequence. Despite the attention to sequencing methods, the nucleotide sequence is just the starting point for genome-wide analyses; at a minimum, the genome sequence must be interpreted using expressed sequence tag (EST) and complementary DNA (cDNA) evidence and computational tools to identify genes and predict the structures of their RNA and protein products. The functions of these products and the manner in which their expression and activities are controlled must then be assessed-a much more challenging task with no clear endpoint that requires a wide variety of experimental and computational methods. We first review the current state of the Drosophila melanogaster genome sequence and its structural annotation and then briefly summarize some promising approaches that are being taken to achieve an initial functional annotation.

PMID:
14527298
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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2.
Genome Biol. 2002;3(12):RESEARCH0080. Epub 2002 Dec 23.

A Drosophila full-length cDNA resource.

Author information

  • 1Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA. staple@fruitfly.org

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

A collection of sequenced full-length cDNAs is an important resource both for functional genomics studies and for the determination of the intron-exon structure of genes. Providing this resource to the Drosophila melanogaster research community has been a long-term goal of the Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project. We have previously described the Drosophila Gene Collection (DGC), a set of putative full-length cDNAs that was produced by generating and analyzing over 250,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) derived from a variety of tissues and developmental stages.

RESULTS:

We have generated high-quality full-insert sequence for 8,921 clones in the DGC. We compared the sequence of these clones to the annotated Release 3 genomic sequence, and identified more than 5,300 cDNAs that contain a complete and accurate protein-coding sequence. This corresponds to at least one splice form for 40% of the predicted D. melanogaster genes. We also identified potential new cases of RNA editing.

CONCLUSIONS:

We show that comparison of cDNA sequences to a high-quality annotated genomic sequence is an effective approach to identifying and eliminating defective clones from a cDNA collection and ensure its utility for experimentation. Clones were eliminated either because they carry single nucleotide discrepancies, which most probably result from reverse transcriptase errors, or because they are truncated and contain only part of the protein-coding sequence.

PMID:
12537569
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC151182
Free PMC Article
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3.
Genome Res. 2002 Aug;12(8):1294-300.

The Drosophila gene collection: identification of putative full-length cDNAs for 70% of D. melanogaster genes.

Author information

  • 1Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, USA. staple@fruitfly.org

Abstract

Collections of full-length nonredundant cDNA clones are critical reagents for functional genomics. The first step toward these resources is the generation and single-pass sequencing of cDNA libraries that contain a high proportion of full-length clones. The first release of the Drosophila Gene Collection Release 1 (DGCr1) was produced from six libraries representing various tissues, developmental stages, and the cultured S2 cell line. Nearly 80,000 random 5' expressed sequence tags (5' expressed sequence tags [ESTs]from these libraries were collapsed into a nonredundant set of 5849 cDNAs, corresponding to ~40% of the 13,474 predicted genes in Drosophila. To obtain cDNA clones representing the remaining genes, we have generated an additional 157,835 5' ESTs from two previously existing and three new libraries. One new library is derived from adult testis, a tissue we previously did not exploit for gene discovery; two new cap-trapped normalized libraries are derived from 0-22-h embryos and adult heads. Taking advantage of the annotated D. melanogaster genome sequence, we clustered the ESTs by aligning them to the genome. Clusters that overlap genes not already represented by cDNA clones in the DGCr1 were analyzed further, and putative full-length clones were selected for inclusion in the new DGC. This second release of the DGC (DGCr2) contains 5061 additional clones, extending the collection to 10,910 cDNAs representing >70% of the predicted genes in Drosophila.

PMID:
12176937
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC186637
Free PMC Article
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