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J Pediatr. 2003 Sep;143(3):335-42.

MS/MS-based newborn and family screening detects asymptomatic patients with very-long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency.

Author information

  • 1Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Department of Pediatrics, Nashville, Tennessee, 37232, USA. Spiekerkoetter@vanderbilt.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To determine whether asymptomatic persons with biochemical evidence of very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) deficiency identified through expanded newborn screening with tandem mass spectometry have confirmed disease.

STUDY DESIGN:

We characterized 8 asymptomatic VLCAD-deficient individuals by enzyme and/or mutational analysis and compared them with clinically diagnosed, symptomatic patients with regard to mutations, enzyme activity, phenotype, and age of disease onset.

RESULTS:

VLCAD molecular analyses in 6 unrelated patients revealed the previously reported V243A mutation, associated with hepatic or myopathic phenotypes, on 7/12 alleles. All other mutations were also missense mutations. Residual VLCAD activities of 6% to 11% of normal were consistent with milder phenotypes. In these identified individuals treated prospectively with dietary modification as preventive measures, clinical symptoms did not develop during follow-up.

CONCLUSIONS:

MS/MS-based newborn screening correctly identifies VLCAD-deficient individuals. Based on mutational and enzymatic findings, these infants probably are at risk of future disease. Because life-threatening metabolic derangement can occur even in otherwise mild phenotypes, we advocate universal newborn screening programs for VLCAD deficiency to detect affected patients and prevent development of metabolic crises. Longer-term follow-up is essential to define outcomes, the definite risk of future disease, and appropriate treatment recommendations.

PMID:
14517516
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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