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Clin Chem. 2003 Oct;49(10):1763-73.

Detecting subsecond dopamine release with fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in vivo.

Author information

  • 1Department of Chemistry, Neuroscience Center, and. Center for Alcohol Studies, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3290, USA.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Dopamine is a potent neuromodulator in the brain, influencing a variety of motivated behaviors and involved in several neurologic diseases. Measurements of extracellular dopamine in the brains of experimental animals have traditionally focused on a tonic timescale (minutes to hours). However, dopamine concentrations are now known to fluctuate on a phasic timescale (subseconds to seconds).

APPROACH:

Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry provides analytical chemical measurements of phasic dopamine signals in the rat brain.

CONTENT:

Procedural aspects of the technique are discussed, with regard to appropriate use and in comparison with other methods. Finally, examples of data collected using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry are summarized, including naturally occurring dopamine transients and signals arising from electrical stimulation of dopamine neurons.

SUMMARY:

Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry offers real-time measurements of changes in extracellular dopamine concentrations in vivo. With its subsecond time resolution, micrometer-dimension spatial resolution, and chemical selectivity, it is the most suitable technique currently available to measure transient concentration changes of dopamine.

PMID:
14500617
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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