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Biomaterials. 1992;13(10):682-92.

Prevention of protein adsorption and platelet adhesion on surfaces by PEO/PPO/PEO triblock copolymers.

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  • 1Purdue University, School of Pharmacy, West Lafayette, IN 47907.

Abstract

Fibrinogen adsorption and platelet adhesion on to dimethyldichlorosilane-treated glass and low-density polyethylene were examined. The surfaces were treated with poly(ethylene glycol) and poly(ethylene oxide)/poly(propylene oxide)/poly(ethylene oxide) triblock copolymers (Pluronics). Poly(ethylene glycol) could not prevent platelet adhesion and activation, even when the bulk concentration for adsorption was increased to 10 mg/ml. Pluronics containing 30 propylene oxide residues could not prevent platelet adhesion and activation, although the number of ethylene oxide residues varied up to 76. However, Pluronics containing 56 propylene oxide residues inhibited platelet adhesion and activation, even though the number of ethylene oxide residues was as small as 19. Fibrinogen adsorption on the Pluronic-coated surfaces was reduced by more than 95% compared to the adsorption on control surfaces. The ability of Pluronics to prevent platelet adhesion and activation was mainly dependent on the number of propylene oxide residues, rather than the number of ethylene oxide residues. The large number of propylene oxide residues was expected to result in tight interaction with hydrophobic dimethyldichlorosilane-treated glass and low-density polyethylene surfaces and thus the tight anchoring of Pluronics to the surfaces. The presence of 19 ethylene oxide residues in the hydrophilic poly(ethylene oxide) chains was sufficient to repel fibrinogen and platelets by the mechanism of steric repulsion.

PMID:
1420713
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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