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J Dent Res. 1992 Nov;71(11):1768-75.

Fluoride concentrations in plaque, whole saliva, and ductal saliva after application of home-use topical fluorides [published eerratum appears in J Dent Res 1993 Jan;72(1):87].

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  • 1Department of Oral Sciences, Eastman Dental Center, Rochester, New York 14620.

Abstract

It is now well-accepted that the primary anti-caries activity of fluoride (F) is via topical action. The retention of F in the mouth after topical fluoride treatment is considered to be an important factor in the clinical efficacy of F. The purpose of this study was to evaluate F levels in ductal saliva, whole saliva, and pooled plaque after treatment with topical F agents intended for home use. Ten consenting adults, mean (SD) age 31.0 (8.2) years, participated in all aspects of the study. Two days before each test, subjects received a professional tooth cleaning and subsequently abstained from all oral hygiene procedures to permit plaque to accumulate, and from the use of F-containing dental products. Treatments consisted of a placebo dentifrice (PD), fluoride dentifrice (FD; 0.24% NaF), fluoride rinse (FR; 0.05% NaF), and fluoride gel (FG; 1.1% NaF). Unstimulated whole saliva and pooled plaque were sampled at multiple points over a 24-hour period. In a separate experimental series, stimulated parotid saliva was sampled over a two-hour period after treatment. Fluoride levels generally followed the same pattern in whole saliva and pooled plaque samples, with FG > FR > FD > PD. Night-time F application resulted in prolonged F retention in whole saliva but not in plaque. Fluoride levels in parotid saliva were only slightly higher after F treatment and returned to baseline levels within two h. The results of this study indicate that the method of F delivery, the F concentration of the agent, and the time of application (daytime vs. night-time) are important factors influencing F levels in the mouth.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

PMID:
1401438
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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