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J Biol Chem. 1992 Oct 5;267(28):20277-81.

MAK3 encodes an N-acetyltransferase whose modification of the L-A gag NH2 terminus is necessary for virus particle assembly.

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  • 1Section on Genetics of Simple Eukaryotes, National Institute of Diabetes, Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892.

Abstract

The MAK3 gene is necessary for propagation of the L-A double-stranded RNA virus of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. MAK3 encodes a protein with substantial homology to the Escherichia coli rimI N-acetyltransferase that acetylates the NH2 terminus of ribosomal protein S18, and shares consensus sequences with a group of N-acetyltransferases. The NH2 terminus of the viral major coat protein encoded by L-A is normally blocked, but we find that it is unblocked in a mak3-1 mutant. L-A virus-encoded proteins produced from a cDNA clone of L-A can encapsidate the L-A (+)-strands in a wild-type host, but not in a mak3-1 mutant strain. The amount of major coat protein found in the particle fraction is reduced greater than 100-fold, and the amount in the total cell extract is reduced 5-10-fold. A modified beta-galactosidase, having as its NH2-terminal the NH2-terminal 13 residues of the L-A-encoded major coat protein, is blocked in a wild-type host, but not in a mak3-1 host. We propose that MAK3 encodes an N-acetyltransferase whose modification of the L-A major coat protein NH2 terminus is essential for viral assembly, and that unassembled coat protein is unstable.

PMID:
1400344
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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