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Diabetologia. 2003 Oct;46(10):1428-37. Epub 2003 Sep 12.

Increased expression of NAD(P)H oxidase subunits, NOX4 and p22phox, in the kidney of streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats and its reversibity by interventive insulin treatment.

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  • 1Department of Medicine and Bioregulatory Science, Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Kyushu University, Fukuoka 812-8582, Japan.

Abstract

AIM/HYPOTHESIS:

An increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) could contribute to the development of diabetic nephropathy. NAD(P)H oxidase might be an important source of ROS production in kidney as reported in blood vessels. In this study, we show the increased expression of essential subunits of NAD(P)H oxidase, NOX4 and p22phox, in the kidney of diabetic rats.

METHODS:

The levels of mRNA of both NOX4 and p22phox were evaluated in kidney from streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats and age-matched control rats at 4 and 8 weeks after onset of diabetes by Northern blot analysis. The localization and expression levels of these components and 8-hydroxy-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), which is a marker of ROS-induced DNA damage, were also evaluated by immunostaining.

RESULTS:

The levels of both NOX4 and p22phox mRNA were increased in the kidney of diabetic rats as compared with control rats. Immunostaining analysis showed that the expression levels of NOX4 and p22phox were clearly increased in both distal tubular cells and glomeruli from diabetic rats. Both the localization and the expression levels of these components were in parallel with those of 8-OHdG. Interventive insulin treatment for 2 weeks completely restored the increased levels of these components in the diabetic kidney to control levels in parallel with those of 8-OHdG.

CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION:

This study provides evidence that NAD(P)H oxidase subunits, NOX4 and p22phox, were increased in the kidney of diabetic rats. Thus, NAD(P)H-dependent overproduction of ROS could cause renal tissue damage in diabetes. This might contribute to the development of diabetic nephropathy.

PMID:
13680125
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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