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Neurosci Res. 1992 Aug;14(3):166-79.

Neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract mediating inputs from emetic vagal afferents and the area postrema to the pattern generator for the emetic act in dogs.

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  • 1Department of Physiology, Kawasaki Medical School, Kurashiki, Japan.

Abstract

Roles of neurons in the nucleus of the solitary tract corresponding to the area subpostrema (mNST) for the retching reflex were investigated in decerebrate, paralyzed dogs. Retching was defined as rhythmic coactivation of the phrenic and abdominal muscle nerves. Retching which had been induced by stimulation of the left and right abdominal vagus nerves was impaired by cooling the left and right mNSTs, respectively. This result indicates that the mNST neurons mediate activities of emetic vagal afferents. All 40 non-respiratory neurons in the mNST, which had excitatory response to pulse train stimulation of the vagus nerve, were also activated by continuous stimulation of the vagus nerve to provoke retching. During provoked retching, however, these neurons did not exhibit any activities modulated in association with retching. The average latency of responses of these neurons to the pulse train stimulation (306.5 ms) was significantly shorter than that of the inspiratory neurons in the lateral NST and the adjacent reticular formation. Discharge frequencies of these neurons in the mNST gradually increased after administration of apomorphine (6/10) and glutamate (14/14) to the 4th ventricle. Antidromic responses to stimulation of the Bötzinger complex were observed in some (20/289) of the mNST neurons. These findings suggest that neurons in the mNST mediate the information from both the abdominal vagal afferents and the area postrema and drive the pattern generator for retching and vomiting, which is assumed to be located in the Bötzinger complex.

PMID:
1331921
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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