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Blood. 2004 Jan 1;103(1):85-92. Epub 2003 Sep 11.

Safety and efficacy of factor IX gene transfer to skeletal muscle in murine and canine hemophilia B models by adeno-associated viral vector serotype 1.

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  • 1Department of Pediatrics, University of Pennsylvani Medical Center, The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA.

Abstract

Adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors (serotype 2) efficiently transduce skeletal muscle, and have been used as gene delivery vehicles for hemophilia B and for muscular dystrophies in experimental animals and humans. Recent reports suggest that AAV vectors based on serotypes 1, 5, and 7 transduce murine skeletal muscle much more efficiently than AAV-2, with reported increases in expression ranging from 2-fold to 1000-fold. We sought to determine whether this increased efficacy could be observed in species other than mice. In immunodeficient mice we saw 10- to 20-fold higher levels of human factor IX (hF.IX) expression at a range of doses, and in hemophilic dogs we observed approximately 50-fold higher levels of expression. The increase in transgene expression was due partly to higher gene copy number and a larger number of cells transduced at each injection site. In all immunocompetent animals injected with AAV-1, inhibitory antibodies to F.IX developed, but in immunocompetent mice treated with high doses of vector, inhibitory antibodies eventually disappeared. These studies emphasize that the increased efficacy of AAV-1 vectors carries a risk of inhibitor formation, and that further studies will be required to define doses and treatment regimens that result in tolerance rather than immunity to F.IX.

PMID:
12969984
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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