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Am J Med Genet A. 2003 Oct 15;122A(3):187-92.

Autosomal recessive multiple epiphyseal dysplasia with homozygosity for C653S in the DTDST gene: double-layer patella as a reliable sign.

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  • 1Center for the Study of Heritable Connective Tissue Diseases, Research Institute, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1X8, Canada. outi.makitie@helsinki.fi

Abstract

Mutations in the diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter (DTDST) gene result in a family of skeletal dysplasias, which comprise lethal (achondrogenesis type 1B and atelosteogenesis type 2) and non-lethal conditions (diastrophic dysplasia and recessive multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (rMED)). The most frequent mutation is R279W, which in a homozygous state results in rMED with bilateral clubfoot, MED, and "double layered" patella. We describe three patients with rMED caused by a previously unreported homozygous mutation in the DTDST gene. The three patients (from two families) were born to healthy, non-consanguineous parents. All developed signs of hip dysplasia in early childhood and two had episodes of recurrent patella dislocation. Two underwent bilateral total hip replacements at ages 13 and 14 years. The feet, external ears, and palate were normal. Stature was normal in all cases. Radiographs showed dysplastic femoral heads, mild generalized epiphyseal dysplasia, abnormal patella ossification, and normal hands and feet. Direct sequence analysis of genomic DNA demonstrated a homozygous 1984T > A (C653S) change in the DTDST gene in all patients. The clinically normal parents were heterozygous for the change. This is the first description of a homozygous C653S mutation of the DTDST gene. Hip dysplasia and patella hypermobility dominates the otherwise mild phenotype. These patients further expand the range of causative mutations in the DTD skeletal dysplasia family.

Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

PMID:
12966518
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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