Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
We are sorry, but NCBI web applications do not support your browser and may not function properly. More information
Midwifery. 2003 Sep;19(3):191-202.

Maternal psychosocial risks predict preterm birth in a group of women from Appalachia.

Author information

  • 1Purdue University School of Nursing, West Lafayette, IN 47907-1337, USA. ejesse@purdue.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To identify and evaluate which psychosocial criteria are associated with preterm birth in a midwifery model of risk in pregnancy.

DESIGN:

A quantitative study with a prospective correlational research design.

SETTING:

Women attending three prenatal clinics in East Tennessee.

PARTICIPANTS:

120 pregnant women between 16 and 28 weeks gestation. The majority of the clinics' clients were from rural Appalachia.

MEASUREMENTS AND FINDINGS:

Multiple logistic regression statistical analysis revealed that women with symptoms of depression, lower levels of self-esteem, or a negative perception of pregnancy had significantly higher odds of delivering a preterm baby.

KEY CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE:

These findings suggest the importance of screening for psychosocial risk factors in pregnancy. Interventions to address these psychosocial risks could improve maternal psychosocial health, maintain continuity of midwifery care, and reduce the incidence of preterm birth.

PMID:
12946335
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk