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Health Policy Plan. 2003 Sep;18(3):299-305.

Equity in access to condoms in urban Zambia.

Author information

  • 1Department of International Health and Development, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans, USA. sagha@tulane.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

This article examines the degree of equity in access to condoms in urban Zambia.

METHODOLOGY:

This study uses data from representative samples of a). men and women in households in urban Zambia and b). providers at retail outlets in urban Zambia.

RESULTS:

A substantial proportion of outlets in urban Zambia (39%) stocked social marketing condoms in 1999. More than 30% of groceries and kiosks - outlets commonly found in low-income residential areas - stocked social marketing condoms. Consumer access to condoms (defined as estimated walking time to a condom source) was greater for poorer compared to wealthier respondents: compared to men with 7-13 assets (wealthier men), men with 2-6 assets were 1.5 times as likely and men with up to one asset were 1.8 times as likely to be within 10 minutes walk of a condom source. Multivariate analysis indicated that greater access to condoms among the poor was a function of greater condom availability in poorer neighbourhoods.

CONCLUSIONS:

Making condoms available in non-traditional outlet types that are commonly found in low-income areas (such as kiosks and groceries) can eliminate socioeconomic inequities in condom access.

PMID:
12917271
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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