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Cancer Chemother Pharmacol. 2003 Nov;52(5):424-30. Epub 2003 Aug 6.

Assessment of normal and tumor tissue uptake of MAG-CPT, a polymer-bound prodrug of camptothecin, in patients undergoing elective surgery for colorectal carcinoma.

Author information

  • 1Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Pharmacia Corporation, 5200 Old Orchard Road, Skokie, Illinois 60077, USA. nenad.sarapa@pharmacia.com

Abstract

PURPOSE:

MAG-camptothecin (MAG-CPT) is the lead compound of a novel drug delivery system in which an active cytotoxic moiety, camptothecin (CPT), is covalently linked to a soluble polymeric carrier (MAG) to form an inactive prodrug. The mechanism of action of CPT remains unaltered, but the delivery system is thought to allow the carrier-bound drug to accumulate in tumor tissues and release the active CPT locally. This proof-of-concept clinical study was designed to determine whether MAG-CPT was preferentially delivered to or retained in tumor tissue compared to adjacent normal tissue or plasma, and to estimate the degree of intratissue release of CPT.

METHODS:

This was an open, non-randomized study in ten adult patients scheduled for elective surgery for colorectal cancer. Patients received a single dose of 60 mg/m2 (CPT equivalent) of MAG-CPT 24 h, 3 days or 7 days prior to surgery. Plasma, tumor, and adjacent normal tissue samples were collected simultaneously at the time of surgery and analyzed for MAG-bound and released CPT concentrations.

RESULTS:

MAG-bound and free CPT concentrations in plasma, tumor, and normal tissue achieved equilibrium by 24 h after dosing, declining in parallel up to 7 days after dosing. MAG-bound CPT was delivered to similar levels to tumor and normal tissue. At 24 h after dosing, the mean+/-SD MAG-bound CPT concentrations were 861+/-216 ng/g in tumor and 751+/-215 ng/g in adjacent normal tissue, and free CPT concentrations were lower in tumor than in normal tissue (12.2+/-4.7 ng/g and 21.9+/-6.7 ng/g, respectively). At 24 h after dosing, mean+/-SD ratios of MAG-bound and free CPT in tumor and plasma were 0.13+/-0.03 and 0.22+/-0.09, respectively, and the ratios did not change for up to 7 days after dosing, indicating a lack of preferential retention of MAG-bound CPT or release of free CPT in tumor. These results are in marked contrast to previous data from animal tumor xenograft studies, where MAG-CPT levels were higher in tissue than in plasma at 3 and 7 days after a single i.v. dose.

CONCLUSIONS:

Delivery of CPT to the target tumor tissue is achievable by means of the MAG-CPT polymer-bound delivery system, with the equilibrium between plasma and tumor tissue concentrations of released CPT being established within 24 h after dosing. However, preferential retention of MAG-bound or released CPT in the tumor relative to normal tissue or plasma was not detected during the 7 days after dosing. The methods employed in our study could be of use in making "go/no-go" decisions on further development of anticancer drugs.

PMID:
12904897
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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