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Psychosom Med. 2003 Jul-Aug;65(4):582-7.

Hostility, social support, and adrenergic receptor responsiveness among African-American and white men and women.

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  • 1Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We examined the relationship between beta-adrenergic receptor responsiveness and hostility and social support in African American and white men and women.

METHODS:

The participants were 149 men and women, aged 25 to 45 years with SBP < 160 and DBP < 105. Hostility and social support were assessed with standardized self-report measures. An isoproterenol challenge was used to evaluate beta-adrenergic receptor responsiveness, and a phenylephrine challenge was used to evaluate alpha-adrenergic receptor responsiveness.

RESULTS:

Hostility and social support were unrelated to alpha-adrenergic receptor responsiveness. Hostility and satisfaction with perceived social support predicted beta-adrenergic receptor responsiveness in multiple linear regression analyses controlling for race, gender, age, SBP, and resting heart rate. High hostility was associated with reduced cardiac beta-adrenergic receptor function among both white and African American men. Low levels of satisfaction with social support were associated with reduced cardiac beta-adrenergic receptor responsiveness among men and women. Hostility and satisfaction with social support shared some variance in models predicting beta-adrenergic receptor responsiveness.

CONCLUSIONS:

Reduced beta-adrenergic receptor responsiveness is associated with higher levels of hostility among men, and is associated with lower levels of satisfaction with social support among men and women. Impaired beta-adrenergic receptor function, which is a common characteristic of cardiovascular disease, may be a marker of increased cardiovascular disease risk among individuals high in hostility and low in social support.

PMID:
12883108
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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