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Toxicol Sci. 2003 Oct;75(2):314-20. Epub 2003 Jul 25.

Effect of 4-nonylphenol on cell proliferation and adipocyte formation in cultures of fully differentiated 3T3-L1 cells.

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  • 1Department of Medical Laboratory Technology, Ehime College of Health Science, Takooda, Tobe-cho, Iyo-gun, Ehime 791-2101, Japan. hmasuno@ehime-chs.ac.jp

Abstract

The effect of 4-nonylphenol (NP) on cell proliferation and adipocyte formation was examined in cultures of fully differentiated 3T3-L1 cells. Following the hormonal induction of differentiation into adipocytes, 3T3-L1 cells were treated for 8 days with or without NP. NP at 5 and 10 microg/ml increased the DNA content by 32% and 68%, respectively, compared with that of the untreated cultures, in which NP was absent during the treatment period. There were many more bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive cells in the NP-treated cultures, in which NP was present at a concentration of 10 microg/ml during the treatment period, compared to the untreated cultures. These results indicate that NP had the ability to stimulate the proliferation of fully differentiated 3T3-L1 cells. NP at 5 and 10 microg/ml decreased the triacylglycerol (TG) content by 26% and 58%, respectively, and decreased the lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity by 51% and 71%, respectively. The lipid droplets in individual cells of the NP-treated cultures were smaller than those of the untreated cultures. The mRNA levels of LPL and adipocyte-specific fatty acid binding protein (aP2) were considerably lower in the NP-treated cultures than in the untreated cultures. Thus, NP also had the ability to inhibit adipocyte formation in cultures of fully differentiated 3T3-L1 cells. A study using an antiestrogen ICI 182,780 showed that the NP-stimulated cell proliferation was mediated partly by the estrogen receptor, while the NP-induced inhibition of adipocyte formation was mediated by a mechanism other than the estrogen receptor.

PMID:
12883076
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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