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Surg Neurol. 2003 Jul;60(1):71-9.

Bone autografting of the calvaria and craniofacial skeleton: historical background, surgical results in a series of 15 patients, and review of the literature.

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  • 1Department of Pharmacology of Natural Molecules and General Anatomy, University of Rome La Sapienza, Piazza le Aldo Moro 5, 00185 Rome, Italy.

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

Although the use of autologous bone for reconstruction of the cranial and facial skeleton underwent a partial reappraisal following the introduction of a vast range of alloplastic materials for this purpose, it has demonstrated definite advantages over the last century and, particularly, during the last decade.

METHODS:

Fifteen patients underwent cranial and/or cranio-facial reconstruction using autologous bone grafting in the Department of Neurologic Sciences-Neurosurgery and the Division of Maxillo-Facial Surgery of the Rome "La Sapienza" University between 1987 and 1995. This group of patients consisted of 8 females and 7 males whose average age was 29.5 years (range 7.5 to 59 years, mean age 30). In all these patients cranioplasty and/or cranio-facial reconstruction had been performed to repair bone defects secondary to benign tumors or tumor-like lesions (12 cases), trauma (2 cases), or, in the remaining case, to wound infection after craniotomy for a neurosurgical operation.

RESULTS:

The results obtained in a series of 15 patients treated using this method are described with reference to the abundant data published on this topic.

CONCLUSION:

The mechanical, immunologic, and technical-grafting properties of autologous bone, together with its superior esthetic and psychological effects, probably make it the best material for cranioplasty.

PMID:
12865021
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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