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J Virol. 2003 Aug;77(15):8280-9.

Pathogenic effects of human herpesvirus 6 in human lymphoid tissue ex vivo.

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  • 1Laboratory of Cellular and Molecular Biophysics, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.

Abstract

Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) is a potentially immunosuppressive agent that has been suggested to act as a cofactor in the progression of human immunodeficiency virus disease. However, the lack of suitable experimental models has hampered the elucidation of the mechanisms of HHV-6-mediated immune suppression. Here, we used ex vivo lymphoid tissue to investigate the cellular tropism and pathogenic mechanisms of HHV-6. Viral strains belonging to both HHV-6 subgroups (A and B) were able to productively infect human tonsil tissue fragments in the absence of exogenous stimulation. The majority of viral antigen-expressing cells were CD4(+) T lymphocytes expressing a nonnaive phenotype, while CD8(+) T cells were efficiently infected only with HHV-6A. Accordingly, HHV-6A infection resulted in the depletion of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, whereas in HHV-6B-infected tissue CD4(+) T cells were predominantly depleted. The expression of different cellular antigens was dramatically altered in HHV-6-infected tissues: whereas CD4 was upregulated, both CD46, which serves as a cellular receptor for HHV-6, and CD3 were downmodulated. However, CD3 downmodulation was restricted to infected cells, while the loss of CD46 expression was generalized. Moreover, HHV-6 infection markedly enhanced the production of the CC chemokine RANTES, whereas other cytokines and chemokines were only marginally affected. These results provide the first evidence, in a physiologically relevant study model, that HHV-6 can severely affect the physiology of secondary lymphoid organs through direct infection of T lymphocytes and modulation of key membrane receptors and chemokines.

PMID:
12857897
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC165251
Free PMC Article

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