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Br J Radiol. 2003 Jul;76(907):459-63.

Could assessment of glioma methylene lipid resonance by in vivo (1)H-MRS be of clinical value?

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  • 1Cancer Research UK Clinical MR Research Group, The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Trust, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5PT, UK.

Abstract

The potential clinical role of in vivo (1)H-MRS ((1)H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy) lipid methylene resonance measurements of human glioma has been assessed. 20 patients, 14 with low grade and 6 with high grade gliomas have been investigated using single voxel (1)H-MRS. Three of the low grade group had undergone transformation by clinical and imaging criteria. Short echo time (TE=20 ms, TR=2500 ms) single voxel Stimulated Echo Acquisition (STEAM) spectra with (acquisitions=64) and without (acquisitions=4) water suppression were acquired. Additionally, T(1) weighted (T(1)W) water spectra (TE=20 ms, TR=888 ms) were acquired pre- and post-injection of Gd-DTPA (0.2 mmol x kg(-1)). The T(1)W water spectra were used to determine the water proton enhancement occurring within the spectroscopic voxel. The enhancement expressed as a percentage was compared with the lipid methylene peak. All the high grade tumours had significantly higher levels of lipid than low grade tumours (p=0.002). Low grade tumours had significantly less water proton enhancement than transformers (p=0.04) and high grade tumours (p=0.001). The lipid methylene signal correlated strongly with the voxel water enhancement (r(2)=0.74, p<0.0001). The data support the view that the spectroscopically detected lipid methylene signal may be a useful criterion in grading glioma. The correlation of the lipid methylene signal with blood-brain barrier breakdown suggests that detection of a previously absent (1)H-MRS lipid methylene signal in low grade tumours might be an early indicator of transformation.

PMID:
12857705
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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