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Am Heart J. 2003 Jul;146(1):121-8.

Prevalence of self-reported heart failure among US adults: results from the 1999 National Health Interview Survey.

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  • 1Division of Health Interview Statistics, National Center for Health Statistics, Center for Disease Control, Hyattsville, MD 20782, USA. hni@cdc.gov

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of the present study was to determine the prevalence of self-reported heart failure among US adults.

METHODS:

Data from the 1999 National Health Interview Survey were analyzed. A total of 30,801 sampled adults aged >or=18 years were given a list of major medical conditions, which included heart failure (HF), and asked if they had ever been told by a doctor or other health professional that they had any of the conditions. Analyses were conducted with the use of SUDAAN software to account for the complex sample design.

RESULTS:

An estimated 2.4 million adults had been told by a doctor or other health professional that they had HF. The prevalence of self-reported HF for age groups 18 to 39, 40 to 64, 65 to 74, and 75 to 105 years were 0.1%, 1.1%, 3.6%, and 5.5%, respectively. HF was most prevalent among ever-smokers, obese persons, and persons aged >or=65 years. No difference was found in the prevalence of self-reported HF between black and white persons. The most common comorbid conditions for those with HF were hypertension, coronary heart disease, and diabetes. Compared with those without HF, the elderly persons with HF were 8 times as likely to have severe mobility difficulties and 2 to 3 times as likely to have severe depression. Half of the elderly persons with HF had been hospitalized, visited an emergency room, or had >10 clinic visits in the past year. Black patients were more likely than white patients to have been unable to pay for prescription medicine and to have seen a medical specialist during the past year.

CONCLUSIONS:

This nationally representative survey indicates that an estimated 2.4 million adults had been told by a doctor or other health professional that they had heart failure. Black patients with HF were less likely than white patients to have received the needed care.

Comment in

PMID:
12851619
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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