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Ann Pharmacother. 2003 Jul-Aug;37(7-8):988-93.

Potentially inappropriate medication use in community residential care facilities.

Author information

  • 1School of Pharmacy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-7360, USA. slgray@u.washington.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To describe the prevalence of potentially inappropriate medication use in community residential care (CRC) facilities at baseline, describe exposure to potentially inappropriate drugs during the 1-year follow-up, and examine characteristics associated with potentially inappropriate use.

DESIGN:

A cohort study was conducted using 282 individuals aged >/=65 years entering a CRC facility in a 3-county area in the Puget Sound region of Washington State between April 1998 and December 1998 on Medicaid funding.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE:

Use of potentially inappropriate medications as defined by explicit criteria (e.g., drugs that should generally be avoided in the elderly because potential risks outweigh any potential benefits).

RESULTS:

Sixty-two (22%) residents took a total of 75 potentially inappropriate medications at baseline. The most common agents used at baseline were oxybutynin (3.5%) and amitriptyline (3.5%). The incidence of new use of potentially inappropriate medications was 0.1/100 person-days during the follow-up period. Potentially inappropriate use was related to self-reported fair or poor health (adjusted OR 1.42; 95% CI 1.05 to 1.92) and number of prescription drugs (adjusted OR 1.12; 95% CI 1.05 to 1.19). In the Cox proportional hazard model, no characteristics predicted new potentially inappropriate medication use during the follow-up.

CONCLUSIONS:

Potentially inappropriate medication use is common among residents in CRC facilities. A comprehensive periodic review may be beneficial for reducing potentially inappropriate use, especially for patients taking multiple drugs.

PMID:
12841805
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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