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Alcohol Clin Exp Res. 2003 Jun;27(6):918-25.

Schedule-induced ethanol self-administration in DBA/2J and C57BL/6J mice.

Author information

  • 1Psychology Department, University of Memphis, Tennessee 38152, USA. G.Mittleman@mail.psyc.memphis.edu

Abstract

BACKGROUND:

The purpose of these experiments was to provide an initial investigation into ethanol self-administration elicited in the schedule-induced polydipsia (SIP) paradigm.

METHODS:

Mature male mice were food deprived to between 80 and 85% of their baseline weight and received 20 daily 1 hr SIP test sessions in which a food pellet (20 mg) was delivered on a fixed-time 60 sec schedule. In different groups, the acquisition of drinking 5% (v/v) ethanol solution (experiment 1) or water (experiment 2) was recorded along with other behaviors that occurred in the test chambers.

RESULTS:

Results indicated that C57BL/6J mice drank significantly more ethanol than DBA/2J mice and that C57 mice achieved blood alcohol concentrations as high as 300 mg/dl. Blood alcohol concentrations were consistently correlated with g/kg ethanol intake. The groups did not differ in consumption of water. SIP test sessions using higher concentrations of ethanol (10-20% v/v, experiment 1) or sucrose solutions (0.1-2% w/v, experiment 2) then were performed. Group differences in ethanol consumption were maintained at all ethanol concentrations. Although DBAs drank more of a low concentration of sucrose (0.1%), when expressed as g/kg, sucrose intake was equivalent in the two strains at all concentrations. Analysis of the time course of drinking clearly showed that this behavior was adjunctive in nature.

CONCLUSION:

These results demonstrate the effectiveness of this procedure in inducing ethanol self-administration and its utility for investigating the genetic bases of vulnerability toward excessive ethanol consumption.

PMID:
12824812
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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