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J Mol Cell Cardiol. 2003 Jul;35(7):841-9.

Identification of the genotypes causing hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in northern Sweden.

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  • 1Department of Medicine, University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden. stellan.morner@medicin.umu.se

Abstract

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is a heterogenous disease, with variable genotypic and phenotypic expressions, often caused by mutations in sarcomeric protein genes. The aim of this study was to identify the genotypes and associated phenotypes related to HCM in northern Sweden. In 46 unrelated individuals with familial or sporadic HCM, mutation analysis of eight sarcomeric protein genes was performed; the cardiac beta-myosin heavy chain, cardiac myosin-binding protein C, cardiac troponin T, alpha-tropomyosin, cardiac essential and regulatory myosin light chains, cardiac troponin I and cardiac alpha-actin. A total of 11 mutations, of which six were novel ones, were found in 13 individuals. Seven mutations were located in the myosin-binding protein C gene, two in the beta-myosin heavy chain gene and one in the regulatory myosin light chain and troponin I genes, respectively. This is the first Swedish study, where a population with HCM has been genotyped. Mutations in the cardiac myosin-binding protein C gene were the most common ones found in northern Sweden, whereas mutations in the beta-myosin heavy chain gene were less frequent than previously described. There are differences in the phenotypes mediated by these genes characterised by a more late-onset disease for the myosin-binding protein C gene mutations. This should be taken into consideration, when evaluating clinical findings in the diagnosis of the disease, especially in young adults in families with HCM, where penetrance can be expected to be incomplete in the presence of a myosin-binding protein C gene mutation.

PMID:
12818575
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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