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Curr Opin Crit Care. 2003 Jun;9(3):189-93.

Strategies for reversing shock-resistant ventricular fibrillation.

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  • 1Division of Cardiology, St Michaels's Hospital, Ontario, Canada.

Abstract

PURPOSE OF REVIEW:

Shock-resistant ventricular fibrillation is defined as ventricular fibrillation persisting after three defibrillation attempts. In approximately 10 to 25% of all cardiac arrests, shock-resistant ventricular fibrillation develops, and 87 to 98% of these patients die.

RECENT FINDINGS:

In the treatment of shock-resistant ventricular fibrillation, defibrillation using biphasic waveforms is considered as an intervention of choice. Intravenous amiodarone is also acceptable, safe, and useful, based on evidence from two randomized clinical trials. Intravenous vasopressin is acceptable and probably safe and useful, but the evidence supporting this recommendation is coming from a small, randomized clinical trial. Procainamide is acceptable but not recommended. In the presence of acute myocardial infarction and recurrent ventricular fibrillation, if all other therapies fail, beta-blockers can be considered. Magnesium, lidocaine, and bretylium are not recommended in the treatment of shock-resistant ventricular fibrillation.

SUMMARY:

Biphasic defibrillation and intravenous amiodarone are useful in shock-resistant ventricular fibrillation.

PMID:
12771668
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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