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Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg. 2003 May;129(5):541-5.

Efficacy of the 2-staged procedure in the management of cholesteatoma.

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  • 1Department of Otolaryngology, Northwestern University School of Medicine, Evanston, Ill 60202, USA. syh_me109g@yahoo.com

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To demonstrate the efficacy of intact canal wall procedure coupled with a second-stage exploration for the treatment of cholesteatoma.

DESIGN:

Retrospective case study of patients with cholesteatomas treated with staged surgical extirpation. A minimum of 6 months' postoperative follow-up time was required for inclusion into the study.

SETTING:

Tertiary academic referral center. Patients A total of 35 adult and pediatric patients, ranging from 9 to 65 years of age, who underwent 2-stage procedures for removal of cholesteatomas.

INTERVENTIONS:

Two-stage procedures, separated by 6 months, performed with posterior tympanotomy approaches.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES:

The presence or absence of cholesteatoma on second-stage look and the subsequent surgical treatment for recurrent cholesteatoma. The overall hearing results after the completion of the 2-staged procedure were calculated.

RESULTS:

Disease was controlled in 26 (74%) of the patients. Residual and/or recurrent cholesteatomas were found in 9 (26%) of the patients during the second-stage operation. Of these patients, 5 (14% of the total group) ultimately required conversion to canal-wall-down procedure. Average hearing gain at the completion of the second-stage procedure was 9 dB.

CONCLUSIONS:

A planned 2-stage procedure that uses the posterior tympanotomy approach for the control of cholesteatoma is an effective technique. This approach offers significant potential for hearing preservation and restoration.

PMID:
12759267
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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