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J Am Vet Med Assoc. 2003 May 1;222(9):1248-51.

Ultrasonographic findings in horses with right dorsal colitis: five cases (2000-2001).

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  • 1Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To determine whether ultrasonography would be useful in the diagnosis of right dorsal colitis in horses.

DESIGN:

Retrospective study.

ANIMALS:

5 horses with right dorsal colitis and 15 healthy adult horses.

PROCEDURE:

Mural thickness and appearance of the right dorsal colon were determined from ultrasonographic images obtained at right intercostal spaces 10, 11, 12, 13, and 14.

RESULTS:

The right dorsal colon could be imaged most consistently at the right 11th, 12th, and 13th intercostal spaces, below the margin of the lung and axial to the liver. Mural thickness measured from ultrasonographic images was significantly greater in horses with right dorsal colitis than in healthy horses. The right dorsal colon in affected horses had a prominent hypoechoic layer associated with submucosal edema and inflammatory infiltrates. Successful treatment of 1 horse with right dorsal colitis was associated with a decrease in mural thickness coincident with an increase in serum albumin and total protein concentrations and weight gain. A decrease in mural thickness was also observed in a second horse treated for right dorsal colitis that was not associated with healing of the right dorsal colon or an increase in serum albumin concentration but rather thinning of a segment of the right dorsal colon that eventually ruptured.

CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE:

Results suggest that ultrasonographic measurement of mural thickness and evaluation of the appearance of the right dorsal colon may be useful in the diagnosis of right dorsal colitis in horses.

PMID:
12725314
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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