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Phytochemistry. 2003 May;63(2):145-53.

The effect of growth phase on the lipid class, fatty acid and sterol composition in the marine dinoflagellate, Gymnodinium sp. in batch culture.

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  • 1CSIRO Marine Research, GPO Box 1538, Hobart, Tasmania 7001, Australia. peter.mansour@csiro.au

Abstract

We have studied the effects of growth phase on the lipid composition in batch cultures of Gymnodinium sp. CS-380/3 over 43 days of culturing. The lipid content increased two fold, from late logarithmic (day 6) to linear growth phase (day 22) then decreased at stationary phase (day 43) while the lipid yield (mg l(-1)) increased 30-fold from day 6 to 30 mg l(-1) at day 43. Changes in fatty acid content mirrored those observed for the total lipid, while the sterol content continued to increase with culture age through to stationary phase. The largest changes occurred in the lipid classes, especially the polar lipids and triacylglycerols (oil). The proportion of triacylglycerols increased from 8% (of total lipids) at day 6 to 30% at day 43, with a concomitant decrease in the polar lipid fraction. The proportions of 16:0 and DHA [22:6(n-3)] increased while those of 18:5(n-3) and EPA [20:5(n-3)] decreased with increasing culture age. The proportion of the major sterol, dinosterol, decreased from 41% (day 6) to 29% (day 43), while the major dinostanol epimer (23R,24R) increased from 33% (day 6) to 38% (day 22). Despite small changes in the proportion of the main sterols, the same sterols were present at all stages of growth, indicating their value as a chemotaxonomic tool for distinguishing between strains within the same genus. Growth phase could be a useful variable for optimising the oil and DHA content with potential for aquaculture feeds and a source of DHA-rich oils for nutraceuticals.

PMID:
12711135
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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