Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Infect Immun. 2003 May;71(5):2373-83.

Potential of lipid core peptide technology as a novel self-adjuvanting vaccine delivery system for multiple different synthetic peptide immunogens.

Author information

  • 1Cooperative Research Centre for Vaccine Technology, Division of Infectious Diseases and Immunology, The Queensland Institute of Medical Research, Brisbane, Queensland 4029, Australia. colleenO@qimr.edu.au

Abstract

This study demonstrates the effectiveness of a novel self-adjuvanting vaccine delivery system for multiple different synthetic peptide immunogens by use of lipid core peptide (LCP) technology. An LCP formulation incorporating two different protective epitopes of the surface antiphagocytic M protein of group A streptococci (GAS)--the causative agents of rheumatic fever and subsequent rheumatic heart disease--was tested in a murine parenteral immunization and GAS challenge model. Mice were immunized with the LCP-GAS formulation, which contains an M protein amino-terminal type-specific peptide sequence (8830) in combination with a conserved non-host-cross-reactive carboxy-terminal C-region peptide sequence (J8) of the M protein. Our data demonstrated immunogenicity of the LCP-8830-J8 formulation in B10.BR mice when coadministered in complete Freund's adjuvant and in the absence of a conventional adjuvant. In both cases, immunization led to induction of high-titer GAS peptide-specific serum immunoglobulin G antibody responses and induction of highly opsonic antibodies that did not cross-react with human heart tissue proteins. Moreover, mice were completely protected from GAS infection when immunized with LCP-8830-J8 in the presence or absence of a conventional adjuvant. Mice were not protected, however, following immunization with an LCP formulation containing a control peptide from a Schistosoma sp. These data support the potential of LCP technology in the development of novel self-adjuvanting multi-antigen component vaccines and point to the potential application of this system in the development of human vaccines against infectious diseases.

PMID:
12704107
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC153267
Free PMC Article
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for HighWire Icon for PubMed Central
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk