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Eur J Appl Physiol. 2003 Jun;89(5):451-9. Epub 2003 Apr 9.

Responses to exercise in the heat related to measures of hypothalamic serotonergic and dopaminergic function.

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  • 1School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, The University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK. m.w.bridge@bham.ac.uk

Abstract

We have studied 12 recreationally active men to measure their responses to exercise in the heat and relate these to measures of hypothalamic function explored with a buspirone [5-hydroxytryptamine 1A (5-HT(1A)) agonist, dopaminergic D(2) antagonist] neuroendocrine challenge, with and without pretreatment with pindolol (5-HT(1A) antagonist). Pindolol treatment allowed the serotonergic and non-serotonergic components of prolactin release to be distinguished. Subjects exercised at 73 (5)% maximal rate of oxygen uptake (VO(2max)) until volitional fatigue at 35 degrees C (relative humidity, 30%). On another two occasions they underwent a buspirone challenge [0.5 mg (kg body mass)(-1)], once with, and once without, pindolol [0.5 mg (kg body mass)(-1)] pretreatment and the circulating plasma concentrations of prolactin were measured for the next 2.5 h. Rectal temperature increased throughout exercise, whilst mean skin temperature remained constant. There was a wide inter-subject variation in prolactin response to the neuroendocrine challenges. The proportion of the prolactin response to buspirone attributable to a non-serotonergic component (most likely dopaminergic) correlated both with exercise duration (r=0.657, P=0.028), rectal temperature at fatigue (r=0.623, P=0.041) and the rate of temperature rise (r=-0.669, P=0.024). Our results suggest that high activity of the dopaminergic pathways in the hypothalamus is a predictor of exercise tolerance in the heat.

PMID:
12684806
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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