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Diabetes Care. 2003 Apr;26(4):1008-15.

A prospective study of sugar intake and risk of type 2 diabetes in women.

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  • 1Division of Preventive Medicine, Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate prospectively whether intake of total or type of sugar is associated with the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The contribution of sugar intake to the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes has not been settled in the context of primary prevention because of limited prospective data.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

The Women's Health Study is a randomized controlled trial of aspirin and vitamin E in the prevention of cardiovascular disease and cancer. A validated semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire was completed by 39,345 women aged 45 years and older. The main outcome was the incidence of type 2 diabetes. The predictor was sugar intake, including sucrose, glucose, fructose, and lactose. Using Cox proportional hazard models, multivariate RRs of type 2 diabetes for increasing quintiles of sugar intake compared with the lowest quintile were estimated.

RESULTS:

Compared with the lowest quintile of sugar intake, the RRs and 95% CIs for the highest quintiles were 0.84 (0.67-1.04) for sucrose, 0.96 (0.78-1.19) for fructose, 1.04 (0.85-1.28) for glucose, and 0.99 (0.80-1.22) for lactose, after adjustment for known risk factors for type 2 diabetes. Similar findings of no association were obtained in subgroup analyses stratified by BMI.

CONCLUSIONS:

Intake of sugars does not appear to play a deleterious role in primary prevention of type 2 diabetes. These prospective data support the recent American Diabetes Association's guideline that a moderate amount of sugar can be incorporated in a healthy diet.

PMID:
12663565
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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