Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2003 Mar 1;28(5):442-5.

The effects of folic acid in the prevention of neural tube development defects caused by phenytoin in early chick embryos.

Author information

  • 1Department of Neurosurgery, Selçuk University Medical School, Konya, Turkey. oguney@doctor.com

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN:

The effects of phenytoin and folic acid on the development of neural tube defects in early chick embryos were studies.

OBJECTIVE:

To investigate the effects of folic acid in the prevention of neural tube development defects.

SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA:

Several studies have shown that phenytoin selectively inhibits neural tube closure. Folic acid supplementation has been reported to decrease the occurrence of neural tube defects.

METHODS:

This study shows the effects of folic acid in preventing neural tube development defects caused by phenytoin in chicks based on light microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and histopathological examination. Forty-five fertile Hubbard Broil eggs, all at Stage 8 (four somite) of development, were divided into three equal groups: Group 1 embryos (n = 15), the control group, were explanted and grown for 18 hours in a nutrient medium (thin albumin). Group 2 embryos (n = 15) were explanted and grown for 18 hours in a nutrient medium containing 500 microg/mL of phenytoin. Group 3 embryos (n = 15) were explanted and grown for 18 hours in a nutrient medium containing 500 microg/mL of phenytoin and 0.4 microg/mL of folic acid.

RESULTS:

After the incubation period, 86.6% of the control embryos (Group 1) had intact neural tubes; 80% of Group 2 and 46.6% of Group 3 embryos showed neural tube defects.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results of this study suggest that phenytoin causes neural tube defects, whereas folic acid decreases the incidence of neural tube development defects caused by phenytoin in early chick embryos.

PMID:
12616154
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk