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Diabetes Care. 2003 Mar;26(3):784-90.

Pramlintide as an adjunct to insulin therapy improves long-term glycemic and weight control in patients with type 2 diabetes: a 1-year randomized controlled trial.

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  • 1Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, Texas, USA.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

Mealtime amylin replacement with the human amylin analog pramlintide, as an adjunct to mealtime insulin replacement, reduces postprandial glucose excursions in patients with type 2 diabetes. The aim of the present study was to assess the long-term efficacy and safety of pramlintide in this patient population.

RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS:

In a 52-week, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, multicenter study, 656 patients with type 2 diabetes (age 57 +/- 10 years, diabetes duration 12 +/- 7 years, BMI 34.0 +/- 7.0 kg/m(2), HbA(1c) 9.1 +/- 1.2%, mean +/- SD) treated with insulin (alone or in combination with sulfonylureas and/or metformin) were randomized to receive additional preprandial subcutaneous injections of either placebo or pramlintide (60 micro g TID, 90 microg BID, or 120 microg BID).

RESULTS:

Treatment with pramlintide 120 micro g BID led to a sustained reduction from baseline in HbA(1c) (-0.68 and -0.62% at weeks 26 and 52, respectively), which was significantly greater than that seen with placebo (P < 0.05). The proportion of patients achieving an HbA(1c) <8% was approximately twofold greater with pramlintide (120 microg BID) than with placebo (46 vs. 28%, P < 0.05). The glycemic improvement with pramlintide 120 micro g BID was accompanied by a mean weight loss (-1.4 kg vs. +0.7 kg with placebo at week 52, P < 0.05) and occurred without an overall increase in the severe hypoglycemia event rate. The most common adverse event associated with pramlintide use was transient, mild-to-moderate nausea.

CONCLUSIONS:

Mealtime amylin replacement with pramlintide 120 microg BID, as an adjunct to insulin therapy, improves long-term glycemic and weight control in patients with type 2 diabetes.

PMID:
12610038
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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