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Br J Cancer. 2003 Feb 24;88(4):487-90.

Apoptosis, ageing and cancer susceptibility.

Author information

  • 1Richard Dimbleby Department of Cancer Research, Guy's, King's and St Thomas' School of Medicine, St Thomas' Hospital, London, UK. r.camplejohn@cancer.org.uk

Abstract

We have previously shown that peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from individuals carrying a germline TP53 mutation show a dramatically reduced apoptotic response to radiation. As part of a study of this phenomenon, we also investigated apoptotic response in a series of breast cancer patients lacking TP53 mutations and in a control group of individuals without cancer. There was a significant reduction in mean apoptotic response with increasing age in all groups. These findings are consistent with a number of studies in rodents, which have demonstrated a reduction in DNA damage-induced apoptosis with increasing age. In addition, after adjusting for age, breast cancer patients showed significantly reduced apoptotic responses compared with normal controls (P=0.002). The odds ratio for breast cancer in women with an apoptotic response of <35%, compared with women with a response of >49%, was 6.42 (95% CI 1.68-24.6). The data further support the hypothesis that a reduction in apoptotic response to DNA damage with increasing age may play a significant role in the age-related increase in cancer.

PMID:
12592359
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2377171
Free PMC Article

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