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Spine (Phila Pa 1976). 2003 Jan 15;28(2):177-9.

Vitamin D deficiency and chronic low back pain in Saudi Arabia.

Author information

  • 1Department of Medicine, Riyadh Armed Forces Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. alfaraj@yahoo.com

Abstract

STUDY DESIGN:

Initial assessment involved 360 patients (90% women and 10% men) attending spinal and internal medicine clinics over a 6-year period who had experienced low back pain that had no obvious cause for more than 6 months. The patients ranged in age from 15 to 52 years.

OBJECTIVES:

To investigate the contribution of vitamin D deficiency as a cause for idiopathic chronic low back pain, to find a simple and sensitive test for screening patients with low back pain for vitamin D deficiency, and to determine the correlation between the vitamin deficiency and pain.

METHODS:

A biochemical assay of serum calcium, phosphate, alkaline phosphatase, and 25-hydroxy vitamin D level was performed before and after treatment with vitamin D supplements.

RESULTS:

Findings showed that 83% of the study patients (n = 299) had an abnormally low level of vitamin D before treatment with vitamin D supplements. After treatment, clinical improvement in symptoms was seen in all the groups that had a low level of vitamin D, and in 95% of all the patients (n = 341).

CONCLUSIONS:

Vitamin D deficiency is a major contributor to chronic low back pain in areas where vitamin D deficiency is endemic. Screening for vitamin D deficiency and treatment with supplements should be mandatory in this setting. Measurement of serum 25-OH cholecalciferol is sensitive and specific for detection of vitamin D deficiency, and hence for presumed osteomalacia in patients with chronic low back pain.

PMID:
12544936
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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