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Pediatr Res. 2003 Feb;53(2):211-6.

Antimicrobial polypeptides of human vernix caseosa and amniotic fluid: implications for newborn innate defense.

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  • 1Department of Woman and Child Health, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.

Abstract

Antimicrobial peptides/proteins are widespread in nature and play a critical role in host defense. To investigate whether these components contribute to surface protection of newborns at birth, we have characterized antimicrobial polypeptides in vernix caseosa (vernix) and amniotic fluid (AF). Concentrated peptide/protein extracts were obtained from 11 samples of vernix and six samples of AF and analyzed for antimicrobial activity using an inhibition zone assay. Proteins/peptides in all vernix extracts exhibited strong antibacterial activity against Bacillus megaterium (strain Bm11), in addition to antifungal activity against Candida albicans, whereas AF-derived proteins/peptides showed only the former activity. Fractions obtained after separation by reverse-phase HPLC exhibited antibacterial activity, with the most pronounced activity in a fraction containing alpha-defensins (HNP1-3). The presence of HNP1-3 was proved by dot blot analysis and confirmed by mass spectrometry. Lysozyme and ubiquitin were identified by sequence analysis in two fractions with antibacterial activity. Fractions of vernix and AF were also positive for LL-37 with dot blot and Western blot analyses, and one fraction apparently contained an extended form of LL-37. Interestingly, psoriasin, a calcium-binding protein that is up-regulated in psoriatic skin and was found recently to exhibit antimicrobial activity, was characterized in the vernix extract. The presence of all of these antimicrobial polypeptides in vernix suggests that they are important for surface defense and may have an active biologic role against microbial invasion at birth.

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PMID:
12538777
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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