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J Clin Oncol. 2003 Jan 15;21(2):189-96.

Smoking among participants in the childhood cancer survivors cohort: the Partnership for Health Study.

Author information

  • 1Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Harvard School of Public Health, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Karen_Emmons@dfci.harvard.edu

Abstract

PURPOSE:

This article describes baseline data collection and the intervention design of Partnership for Health, a smoking cessation intervention for smokers in the Childhood Cancer Survivors Study. The purpose of this article is to evaluate demographic, psychosocial, and cancer-related factors that are associated with smoking behavior and mediators of smoking cessation.

PATIENTS AND METHODS:

This study includes 796 smokers from the Childhood Cancer Survivors Study database who were diagnosed with cancer before the age of 21, had survived at least 5 years, and were at least 18 years of age at the time of the baseline survey. Correlates of smoking behaviors included smoking rate, number of recent quit attempts, and nicotine dependence; two key mediators of smoking cessation, readiness to quit smoking and self-efficacy, were also assessed.

RESULTS:

Participants smoked, on average, 14 cigarettes/day; 53.2% were nicotine dependent, and 58% had made at least one quit attempt in the past year. Smoking behaviors were primarily associated with demographic variables; mediators of cessation were primarily associated with age at cancer diagnosis and perceived vulnerability to smoking-related illnesses. Severity of psychologic symptoms was associated with increased smoking rate, high nicotine dependence, and low self-efficacy. Support for quitting was related to smoking rate, number of quit attempts, readiness to quit smoking, and self-efficacy.

CONCLUSION:

These findings indicate that many cancer survivors who smoke are receptive to smoking cessation interventions. Factors related to mediators of smoking cessation might be particularly good targets for intervention.

PMID:
12525509
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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