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Radiology. 2003 Jan;226(1):214-20.

Steady-state blood volume measurements in experimental tumors with different angiogenic burdens a study in mice.

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  • 1Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Bldg 149, 13th St, 5406, Charlestown, MA 02129, USA.

Abstract

PURPOSE:

To experimentally validate the effectiveness of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging enhanced with long-circulating iron oxide for measurement of vascular volume fractions (VVFs) as indicators of angiogenesis in different experimental tumor models.

MATERIALS AND METHODS:

Tumors with differing degrees of angiogenesis-9L rodent gliosarcoma, DU4475 human mammary adenocarcinoma, HT1080 human fibrosarcoma, and EOMA hemangioendothelioma--were implanted in nude mice. Tumoral VVFs were measured at submillimeter voxel resolutions by using 1.5-T MR imaging. A technetium-labeled intravascular radiotracer was injected into a subset of the animals to validate the MR imaging measurements. Microvessel density and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) also were measured. Statistical analysis was performed with analysis of variance.

RESULTS:

High-resolution multisection MR maps of tumor blood volume were obtained in all tumor models. Mean tumoral VVF differed significantly among the different tumors: 2.1% +/- 0.3 (standard error of mean) for 9L gliosarcoma, 3.1% +/- 0.4 for DU4475 mammary adenocarcinoma, 5.5% +/- 0.8 for HT1080 fibrosarcoma, and 6.6% +/- 0.9 for EOMA hemangioendothelioma (P <.01). There was a strong correlation between the MR imaging and radiotracer measurements. There was considerable intra- and intertumoral heterogeneity among the VVFs. MR imaging measurements were in accordance with conventional measurements of angiogenesis, such as microvessel density count and VEGF.

CONCLUSION:

Measurements of tumoral VVF at high-resolution MR imaging with long-circulating iron oxide are feasible and correlate with angiogenic burden in experimental tumor models.

Copyright RSNA, 2002

PMID:
12511693
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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