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Am Fam Physician. 2002 Dec 15;66(12):2259-66.

Gluten-sensitive enteropathy (celiac disease): more common than you think.

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  • 1Department of Family and Community Medicine, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock 72205, USA. nelsendavida@uams.edu

Abstract

Gluten-sensitive enteropathy or, as it is more commonly called, celiac disease, is an autoimmune inflammatory disease of the small intestine that is precipitated by the ingestion of gluten, a component of wheat protein, in genetically susceptible persons. Exclusion of dietary gluten results in healing of the mucosa, resolution of the malabsorptive state, and reversal of most, if not all, effects of celiac disease. Recent studies in the United States suggest that the prevalence of celiac disease is approximately one case per 250 persons. Gluten-sensitive enteropathy commonly manifests as "silent" celiac disease (i.e., minimal or no symptoms). Serologic tests for antibodies against endomysium, transglutaminase, and gliadin identify most patients with the disease. Serologic testing should be considered in patients who are at increased genetic risk for gluten-sensitive enteropathy (i.e., family history of celiac disease or personal history of type I diabetes) and in patients who have chronic diarrhea, unexplained anemia, chronic fatigue, or unexplained weight loss. Early diagnosis and management are important to forestall serious consequences of malabsorption, such as osteoporosis and anemia.

PMID:
12507163
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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