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Genome. 2002 Dec;45(6):1134-41.

Two different genes encoding acetylcholinesterase existing in cotton aphid (Aphis gossypii).

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  • 1College of Plant Protection, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095, PR China.

Abstract

Two acetylcholinesterase (AChE) genes, Ace1 and Ace2, have been cloned from cotton aphid, Aphis gossypii Glover, using the rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) technique. To the best of our knowledge, this should be the first direct molecular evidence that multiple AChE genes exist in insects. The Ace1 gene was successfully amplified along its full length of 2371 bp. The open reading frame is 2031 bp long and encodes 676 amino acids (GenBank accession No. AF502082). The Ace2 gene was amplified as a mega-fragment of 2130 bp lacking part of 5'-end untranslated region (UTR). The open reading frame is 1992 bp long and ecodes a protein of 664 amino acids (GenBank accession No. AF502081). Both genes have the conserved amino acids and features shared by the AChE family, but share only 35% identity in amino acid sequence. The Ace1 gene is highly homologous to the AChE gene of Schizaphis graminum (AF321574) with 95% identity, and Ace2 to that of Myzus persicae (AF287291) with 92% identity. Phylogenetic analysis showed that the two cloned AChEs of A. gossypii are different in evolution. The phylogenetic tree generated by the PHYLIP program package inferred that AChE2 of A. gossypii is a more ancestral form of AChE. Homology modeling of structures using Torpedo californica (2ACE_) and Drosophila melanogaster (1Q09:A) native acetylcholinesterase structure as main template indicated that the two AChEs of Aphis gossypii might have different three-dimensional structures. Alternative splicing of Ace1 near the 5'-end resulting in two proteins differing by the presence or absence of a fragment of four amino acids is also reported.

PMID:
12502259
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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