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Ostomy Wound Manage. 2002 Nov;48(11):28-40.

Re-introducing honey in the management of wounds and ulcers - theory and practice.

Author information

  • Department of Biological Sciences, University of Waikato, Private Bag 3105, Hamilton, New Zealand. pmolan@waikato.ac.nz.

Abstract

Dressing wounds with honey, a standard practice in past times, went out of fashion when antibiotics came into use. Because antibiotic-resistant bacteria have become a widespread clinical problem, a renaissance in honey use has occurred. Laboratory studies and clinical trials have shown that honey is an effective broad-spectrum antibacterial agent that has no adverse effects on wound tissues. As well as having an antibacterial action, honey also provides rapid autolytic debridement, deodorizes wounds, and stimulates the growth of wound tissues to hasten healing and start the healing process in dormant wounds. Its anti-inflammatory activity rapidly reduces pain, edema, and exudate and minimizes hypertrophic scarring. It also provides a moist healing environment for wound tissues with no risk of maceration of surrounding skin and completely prevents adherence of dressings to the wound bed so no pain or tissue damage is associated with dressing changes. Using appropriate dressing practice overcomes potential messiness and handling problems.

PMID:
12426450
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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