Display Settings:

Format

Send to:

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Clin Neurophysiol. 2002 Nov;113(11):1815-21.

Actigraphic assessment of sleep-wake rhythm during the first 6 months of life.

Author information

  • 1Institute of Clinical Neurophysiology, Division of Neurology, University Medical Centre, Zaloska 7, SI-1525 Ljubljana, Slovenia. barbara.gnidovec@mf.uni-lj.si

Abstract

OBJECTIVES:

To examine the validity of the "Gaehwiler" actigraph (Gaehwiler Electronics, model Z80-32k V(1)) for the assessment of sleep-wake (S/W) rhythm and sleep structure in infants during the first 6 months of life using an algorithm developed in our laboratory to differentiate sleep and wake states.

METHODS:

A continuous 72 h actigraphic recording was performed in 10 healthy infants at 1, 3 and 6 months of age. The actigraphic data were matched to direct observation of the infants' behavioural states. Using discriminant function analysis a scoring algorithm for automatic identification of S/W states from raw activity data was developed. The chi-square periodogram analysis was performed to estimate periodic components of S/W rhythm.

RESULTS:

The overall agreement rates between the actigraphic and observer scoring for S/W were between 87 and 95% for the infants after the third month of life, while for the 1-month-old infants they never exceeded 72%. The actigraphic discrimination between active and quiet sleep was the best in 3-month-old infants. The circadian influence on S/W rhythm was already present by the end of the first month of life.

CONCLUSIONS:

Using the "Gaehwiler" actigraph in our study, valid discrimination between sleep and wake states was obtained in infants during 3 and 6 months. The actigraph, however, did not provide valid active vs. quiet sleep state measures. The circadian rhythm of S/W was observed as early as during the first month of life.

PMID:
12417236
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Elsevier Science
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk