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Blood. 2003 Feb 15;101(4):1290-8. Epub 2002 Oct 3.

Immunologic potential of donor lymphocytes expressing a suicide gene for early immune reconstitution after hematopoietic T-cell-depleted stem cell transplantation.

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  • 1Cancer Immunotherapy and Gene Therapy Program and Bone Marrow Transplantation Unit, Istituto Scientifico H. S. Raffaele, Milan, Italy.

Abstract

We have previously shown that the infusion of donor lymphocytes expressing the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) gene is an efficient tool for controlling graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) while preserving the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect. In addition to the GVL effect, the administration of donor HSV-tk(+) cells could have a clinical impact in promoting immune reconstitution after T-cell-depleted stem cell transplantation (SCT). To explore this hypothesis, we have investigated whether in vitro polyclonal activation, retroviral transduction, immunoselection, and expansion affect the immune competence of donor T cells. We have observed that, after appropriate in vitro manipulation, T cells specific for antigens relevant in the context of SCT are preserved in terms of frequency, expression of T-cell receptor, proliferation, cytokine secretion, and lytic activity. A reduction in the frequency of allospecific T-cell precursors is observed after prolonged T-cell culture, suggesting that cell manipulation protocols involving a short culture time and high transduction efficiency are needed. Finally, the long-term persistence of HSV-tk(+) cells was observed in a patient treated in the GVL clinical trial, and a reversion of the phenotype of HSV-tk(+) cells from CD45RO(+) to CD45RA(+) was documented more than 2 years after the infusion. Based on all this evidence, we propose a clinical study of preemptive infusions of donor HSV-tk(+) T cells after SCT from haploidentical donors to provide early immune reconstitution against infection and potential immune protection against disease recurrence.

PMID:
12393508
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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