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J Natl Med Assoc. 2002 Sep;94(9):820-32.

Do beliefs of inner-city parents about disease and vaccine risks affect immunization?

Author information

  • 1Graduate School of Public Health, University of Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA. Trauth@pitt.edu

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

The objective of this study was to understand how low income, inner-city parents of preschool children think about childhood diseases and prevention and the impact that this has on late receipt of vaccines.

METHODS:

Parents of all children born between January 1, 1991, and May 31, 1995, whose child received medical assistance and health care at one of four inner-city, primary care clinics in Pittsburgh, PA, completed a telephone interview and gave consent for a vaccine record review. The main outcome measures were lateness for first and third diphtheria and tetanus toxoids and pertussis vaccines (DTP) and not receiving at least four DTP, three polio virus containing and one measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) doses by 19 months.

RESULTS:

A total of 483 parents participated. Fifteen percent of children were late for the first DTP, 52% for the third DTP, and 40% had not received at least four DTP, three polio and one MMR by 19 months of age. Statistically significant factors associated with lateness at 19 months included: having three or more children, having two children, beliefs regarding the severity of immunization side effects, and being African American.

CONCLUSIONS:

The results of this study indicate that a combination of life circumstances, as well as cognitive factors were associated with late immunization.

PMID:
12392046
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PMCID:
PMC2594140
Free PMC Article
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