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Ann Plast Surg. 2002 Oct;49(4):385-90.

Primary cutaneous mucormycosis: guide to surgical management.

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  • 1Division of Plastic Surgery, University of Rochester, Children's Hospital at Strong, Box 661, 601 Elmwood Avenue, Rochester, NY 14642, USA.

Abstract

Mucormycosis is the most acute, fulminate, and fatal of all fungal infections in humans. It presents most frequently in immunocompromised patients, but can occur in healthy patients in the presence of often-insignificant trauma. Surgical management of primary cutaneous mucormycosis is almost always required. Case reports of surgical treatment for primary cutaneous mucormycosis are reported in the literature; however, the extent of debridement required for cure is unclear and no uniform plan of treatment has been suggested. To date, no clinical guidelines exist to assist the clinician in the surgical management of this disease. This article reviews the literature, reports on two clinical cases, and submits clinical guidelines designed to assist the clinician in the surgical management of primary cutaneous mucormycosis. Because of the infrequent and potentially fatal nature of the diagnosis, a high index of suspicion and a low threshold for wound biopsy must be maintained. Wound cultures are grossly inadequate and should not be relied on for a false sense of security. It is recommended that, for the early diagnosis of cutaneous mucormycosis, chemotherapy and surgical debridement of grossly necrotic tissue be performed at the earliest possible time. The debrided wound is monitored for the resolution of surrounding erythema and induration before definitive reconstruction. In the case of delayed diagnosis and/or advanced or rapidly progressive disease, surgical debridement of all involved tissue, in addition to chemotherapy, is warranted.

PMID:
12370644
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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