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Appetite. 2002 Oct;39(2):159-66.

Memory for recent eating and its influence on subsequent food intake.

Author information

  • 1School of Psychology, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, UK. s.higgs.1@bham.ac.uk

Abstract

The effect of being reminded of a recent eating episode on subsequent food intake was examined in unrestrained eaters. In Experiment 1, female participants were exposed to a "lunch cue" (in which they were asked to think about what they had eaten for lunch), or "no cue" (free thought condition), for 5 min prior to eating. Participants ate less following exposure to the "lunch cue" than the "no cue" condition. In Experiment 2, food intake was measured following exposure to either a "lunch today" cue, "lunch yesterday" cue or "no cue" condition. Intake in the "lunch today" condition was suppressed relative to both the "lunch yesterday" and "no cue" condition. Subjective ratings of hunger, fullness, and desire to eat did not vary as a function of cue type in either Experiment 1 or Experiment 2. These results are consistent with the suggestion that memory of recent eating is an important cognitive factor influencing food intake.

Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Ltd.

PMID:
12354684
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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