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Am J Obstet Gynecol. 2002 Sep;187(3):777-84.

Vitamin C and E supplementation in women at risk of preeclampsia is associated with changes in indices of oxidative stress and placental function.

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  • 1Maternal and Fetal Research Unit, Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology and Centre for Cardiovascular Biology and Medicine, Guy's King's and St Thomas' School of Medicine, King's College, London, UK.

Abstract

OBJECTIVE:

We have previously reported a reduced incidence of preeclampsia in women who were at risk and were taking vitamin C (1000 mg/d) and vitamin E (400 IU/d) supplements. In this study, we determined whether supplementation in the same cohort was associated with an improvement in indices of placental dysfunction and oxidative stress toward values determined in women who were at low risk of preeclampsia.

STUDY DESIGN:

Seventy-nine women who were at high risk and who were taking vitamin supplements and 81 who were taking placebos were compared with 32 women who were at low risk and who were not taking supplements who were studied simultaneously.

RESULTS:

Indices of oxidative stress and placental function were abnormal in the placebo group. When the placebo group was compared with the women who were at low risk, ascorbic acid, plasminogen activator inhibitor-2, and placenta growth factor concentrations were decreased; and 8-epi-prostaglandin F(2alpha),leptin, and the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1/-2 ratio were increased. In the group that received vitamin supplements, ascorbic acid, 8-epi-prostaglandin F(2alpha), leptin, and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1/-2 values were similar to women who were at low risk.

CONCLUSION:

Antioxidant supplementation in women who were at risk of preeclampsia was associated with improvement in biochemical indices of the disease.

PMID:
12237663
[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
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