Format

Send to

Choose Destination
See comment in PubMed Commons below
Genet Test. 2002 Summer;6(2):115-8.

What does my doctor think? Preferences for knowing the doctor's opinion among women considering clinical testing for BRCA1/2 mutations.

Author information

  • 1Department of Medicine and Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA 19104-6021, USA. karmstro@mail.med.upenn.edu

Abstract

The traditional emphasis on nondirectiveness in genetic counseling has become increasingly controversial with the rapid expansion of genetic testing in clinical medicine. This study was done to determine whether women considering clinical testing for BRCA1/2 mutations want to know their health care providers' opinions about whether or not they should undergo testing. Participating in the study was a retrospective cohort of 335 women who participated in a university-based clinic offering breast cancer risk assessment, genetic counseling, and BRCA1/2 testing between January, 1996, and April, 1998. A total of 242 women (77%) wanted to know if the doctors at the Breast and Ovarian Cancer Risk Evaluation Program (BCREP) thought they should be tested, 28 women (9%) were unsure, and 46 women (14%) did not want a BCREP doctor's opinion on testing. A total of 158 women (49%) wanted to know if their primary doctor thought they should be tested, 31 women (10%) were unsure, and 130 women (41%) did not want to know. Desire to know the opinion of the BCREP doctors was inversely associated with having undergone BRCA1/2 testing (RR 0.83, 95% CI 0.73-0.95) and having a breast cancer diagnosis (RR 0.86, 95% CI 0.75-0.99). Desire to know their primary doctor's opinion was inversely associated with having undergone BRCA1/2 testing (RR 0.72, 95% CI 0.56-0.92). Our study suggests that over three-quarters of women who considered clinical testing for BRCA1/2 mutations wanted to know the opinions of the cancer genetics doctors and almost half wanted to know their primary doctor's opinion about whether or not they should undergo testing. These results support the use of models of genetic counseling that allow for sharing the health care providers' opinions when desired by the patient.

[PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]
PubMed Commons home

PubMed Commons

0 comments
How to join PubMed Commons

    Supplemental Content

    Full text links

    Icon for Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.
    Loading ...
    Write to the Help Desk